About our Editors

Ottmar Janssen, Editorial Board Member
Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany
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Ottmar Janssen ia a Professor for Molecular Immunology at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel and Head of the Molecular Immunology Laboratory at the Institute for Immunology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel, Germany.
Ottmar graduated in 1986 with a Diploma in Biology after studying at the University of Ulm, Germany. In 1989, he obtained a PhD in immunology from the University of Ulm and gained first postdoctoral experience at the Institute for Immunology in Heidelberg. From January 1992 to June 1994, he was a postdoctoral fellow and research assistant at the Department of Tumor Immunology, Dana-Farber-Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. He then moved to the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute in Langen, Germany, where he established an independent research group in the Department of Immunology. In 1999, Ottmar moved to the Institute for Immunology in Kiel.
Starting with his doctoral research, Ottmar got interested in cellular and molecular mechanisms of activation and desactivation of lymphocytes. Having been among the pioneers to describe AICD in normal T cells, he got more and more interested in the molecular signaling mechanisms and networks of T cell activation and death. His more recent work aims at understanding the regulation and function of death factors and their receptors, and the storage and mobilization of cytotoxic effector proteins in T lymphocytes. In 2006, Ottmar established a 2D-DIGE facility to introduce proteomic approaches into several aspects of his research.
In 1995, Ottmar founded the “Working Group Signal Transduction” as one of the first study groups of the German Society for Immunology. In 1998, out of a joint venture with signaling study groups of the German Society for Cell Biology (chair: Ralf Hass) and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (chair: Karlheinz Friedrich), the Signal Transduction Society was established as an interdisciplinary research society. Since then Ottmar and his colleagues strive to provide a platform for interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge and ideas covering all aspects of signaling research. Two examples of these efforts are the annual STS meetings and the journal project Cell Communication and Signaling.